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A Coyote Is Rescued After Trying To Go For A Swim In San Francisco Bay

Sarrah M

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Most folks who visit Fisherman’s Wharf and the Pier 39 area of San Francisco City tend to do it on the weekend. So, for the locals, the weekdays are far better times to go for a walk, avoiding crowds and congestion, and having an open area to relax and destress. However, on a given Thursday in the middle of the week, a coyote pup somehow managed to find her way onto the urban San Francisco peninsula and then take an unhealthy dip into the San Francisco Bay’s cold waters.

The coyote has been roaming the City streets for a while, likely eating out of trash cans and similar, given how much opportunity there is in the City for scavenging. However, unlike rural areas, cities have full departments dedicated to catching stray animals and stopping them from becoming a problem for residents. So, soon enough, this particular coyote pup had an unwanted fan club in the form of the City’s animal control chasing her down. In the midst of that pursuit, the coyote pup took a wrong turn and thought to evade the control officers by jumping off the pier. The shock on the animal’s face will likely never be recorded, but she did end up in the cold water pretty quickly, to the amusement of some local seals.

The whole chase got started because the coyote got herself stuck in a resident’s backyard without a clear way out. San Francisco inner city backyards are fairly small, about the size of most family rooms in a home in most cases, so the residents were likely freaked out to suddenly find a snapping stray dog in their yard. By the time officers arrived, however, the coyote was gone. It appeared next when moving at an erratic pace in the area of Pier 39. The chase was on. The coyote was actively afraid of humans and even got herself wedged between dock parts at one point. With the officers closing in, the coyote panicked, got free and then took her leap for freedom, or a cold bath.

Not used to swimming, the coyote was immediately struggling, just trying to keep above the water and figure out where to go. A nearby boat closed in and one of the animal control officers jumped onto it to reach in and snag the coyote with a control lasso. Soon enough, the pup was out of the drink and firmly secured in the back of an animal control truck. Fortunately, however, the pup wasn’t going to maximum security. Instead, it was checked out by the city veterinarian crew, warmed up again due to suffering from hypothermia, and eventually relocated to a wild area likely south of the city and away from people.

Given the experience, it’s likely the coyote pup will never venture anywhere close to San Francisco neighborhoods again, but the animal was a bit of a different experience for the control officers. Dog-like but wiry, coyotes are extremely fast, smart, and resourceful in surviving. Folks had their hands full just trying to corral a young female in this case. And, it’s not every day they get fished out of the Bay either.

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Surprise Birthday Party At 112 Years Old

Amanda J

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On February 28th, 2023, the town of Wellesley, Massachusetts, came together to celebrate the 112th birthday of Herlda Senhouse, the town’s oldest citizen. The surprise gathering was put together by locals who wanted to honor the remarkable woman and her contributions to the community.

Senhouse, who was born on February 28th, 1911, is a beloved member of the Wellesley community. She has lived in the town for over 60 years and has been actively involved in local organizations and community events. Senhouse is known for her warm smile, sharp wit, and kind heart, which have endeared her to many in the town.

One of Senhouse’s most significant contributions to the community was her founding of Boston’s Clique Club in the 1960s. The social club was dedicated to raising money to help educate Black students in the Boston area. Senhouse and other members of the club believed that education was the key to achieving social justice and worked tirelessly to support educational opportunities for Black students.

At the birthday celebration, Senhouse was surrounded by family, friends, and members of the community who came together to wish her a happy birthday and express their appreciation for her life and contributions. The event was a testament to the impact that Senhouse has had on the town of Wellesley and the lives of those around her.

As the celebration came to a close, Senhouse expressed her gratitude for the outpouring of love and support she had received. She thanked those in attendance and said that she was proud to be a member of the Wellesley community. Herlda Senhouse is truly an inspiration and a reminder of the power of community and the impact that one person can have on the world.

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NYC Owl Escapes Zoo and Starts A New Life In The Wild

Danielle S

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Flaco, the escaped zoo owl, has captivated the attention of people all over the world as he evaded capture for two weeks after escaping from New York City’s Central Park Zoo. However, the story has a happy ending as Flaco can now remain in the wild, thanks to his successful hunting and eating prey.

Flaco is a Eurasian eagle-owl, a large and majestic bird of prey that is found across Europe and Asia. He was living in captivity at the Central Park Zoo when vandals cut the mesh on his cage, allowing him to escape into the surrounding area. Zoo officials and animal experts immediately began searching for Flaco, fearing that he would not be able to survive in the wild after living in captivity for so long.

However, Flaco surprised everyone with his ability to adapt to his new environment. He quickly learned how to hunt and eat prey, and has been thriving in the wild ever since. Animal researchers have been keeping a close eye on Flaco, but efforts to recapture him have been called off, as he appears to be doing just fine on his own.

The story of Flaco is a testament to the resilience and adaptability of nature. Despite the challenges of living in the wild, Flaco has been able to survive and even thrive, thanks to his natural instincts and hunting skills. His story is also a reminder of the importance of preserving natural habitats and allowing animals to live in their natural environment.

Flaco, the escaped zoo owl, has captured the hearts of people all over the world with his incredible story of survival in the wild. Despite escaping from captivity, he has been able to adapt to his new environment and thrive, thanks to his natural instincts and hunting skills.

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Bear Successfully Rescued From Frozen Culvert In Northern Minnesota

Danielle S

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A bear was saved by the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) in northwest Minnesota in a heartwarming rescue. When a passing motorist noticed the bear, it was stuck in a ditch and unable to climb out. The DNR was notified immediately, and a team of experts was dispatched to the scene.


The bear, a young adult of about two years old, was discovered to be in good health but distressed. The DNR team quickly assessed the situation and devised a plan to return the bear to its natural habitat.


The rescue operation was delicate because the team had to keep the bear’s safety and well-being in mind. Special equipment and techniques were used by the DNR to carefully lift the bear out of the ditch and place it on a stretcher. The bear was then transported to a nearby location before being released back into the wild.


The successful bear rescue demonstrated the DNR team’s skill and expertise. The bear was unharmed when it was returned to its natural habitat, and it quickly ran off into the forest, free once more.


This is just one of many rescues carried out by the DNR each year. This rescue is a prime example of the organization’s important work in protecting and conserving wildlife and their habitats. The DNR works tirelessly to protect all wildlife in Minnesota and to ensure that they have the resources they need to carry out their missions.

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9 Year Old Is So Passionate About Learning That He Starts College Very Early

Sarrah M

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David Balogun, a nine-year-old from Pennsylvania, has made headlines for beginning college so young. Balogun, who was born in 2013, was admitted to college after demonstrating exceptional intelligence and a strong desire to learn. He is currently enrolled in a community college in Newtown, Pennsylvania, where he is studying mathematics, science, and engineering.


Balogun’s path to college began at a young age when he demonstrated an exceptional aptitude for learning as well as an insatiable curiosity about the world around him. Balogun was already reading and writing at an advanced level at the age of six, and his parents recognized his potential and encouraged him to pursue his interests. They enrolled him in a gifted children’s advanced program, where he excelled and quickly rose to the top.


Despite his young age, Balogun is described by his classmates and professors as a dedicated and hardworking student who is always eager to learn. His grades and test scores reflect his strong work ethic and passion for mathematics. He is also a quick learner who has made significant progress in his studies, receiving high marks in his coursework and exams.


Balogun is thriving and determined to make the most of this opportunity. He spends the majority of his free time studying and reading, and he is constantly looking for new ways to challenge himself and broaden his knowledge. He is also an inspiration to other young people.


Balogun’s story demonstrates the power of hard work, determination, and a desire to learn. He is an inspiration to young students everywhere, demonstrating that anything is possible with dedication and effort. While his journey is unusual, it serves as a reminder that education knows no bounds and that age should never be an impediment to achieving one’s goals.

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First Wild Kiwi Egg Laid in Wellington in A Century

Danielle S

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The first wild kiwi egg to be laid in Wellington in more than a century is a historic event for both conservationists and animal lovers. Due to habitat damage and predation by imported predators like stoats and feral cats, the kiwi, New Zealand’s national bird, has been experiencing population reduction in recent years.

The last wild kiwi in the region was last spotted in the early 1900s, and Wellington’s kiwi population has been particularly heavily impacted. The Zealandia wildlife sanctuary and the neighborhood iwi (original Maori tribe) have been leading a new project to encourage the kiwi to return to the region.

A predator-proof fence was first built around the 225-hectare sanctuary as part of the effort, allowing local species to flourish without concern for predation. This offered the kiwi a secure sanctuary, and a breeding program was started to increase the population.

The first wild kiwi egg to be laid in Wellington in well than a century was finally discovered after many years of toil and dedication. A ranger discovered the egg while doing a normal survey of the sanctuary’s kiwi population, and it was then brought right away to the Zealandia hatchery for incubation.

The birth of this kiwi chick is a significant accomplishment for Wellington’s conservation efforts and the kiwi species as a whole. It serves as a reminder that endangered animals can be saved from extinction with the appropriate actions and commitment.

The kiwi chick is not simply a sign of hope for this species’ survival, but also Wellington’s entire ecology. Kiwis’ are key seed dispersers in their ecology and aid in the management of invertebrate populations. If they suddenly vanish, the entire ecosystem may be affected.

A great example of how local groups and conservationists may collaborate to make conservation efforts succeed is the breeding program at Zealandia. The collaboration between Zealandia and the local iwi, which provides practical support like kiwi population monitoring together with cultural and spiritual counseling, has been crucial to the program’s success.

With plans in place to release more kiwis into the wild in the upcoming years, the kiwi population in Wellington has a promising future. The quest to bring the kiwi back to Wellington has just begun, but this is a big step in the right direction.

The first wild kiwi egg hatched in Wellington in more than a century is a testament to conservation efforts and the fruit of a fruitful collaboration between the community, the local iwi, and the Zealandia wildlife sanctuary. It serves as a reminder that we are capable of saving endangered animals from extinction with perseverance and hard effort. We anticipate the Wellington kiwi population’s continuous growth and the contribution they will make to the ecosystem.

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