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The Little Dog That Could, Even Missing Two Legs

Many dogs that lose their legs find it almost impossible to survive without some serious help from humans, and even then such pets typically don’t live very long. The struggle and inability to take care of itself makes it an extreme challenge to stay healthy. Complications, hygiene and even diet are all severely affected by an inability to move effectively. And dogs don’t have near the mental capacity to understand how to use tools to solve basic needs.

A Challenge from Day One

Nessie McNubbins is a Chihuahua which, for those unfamiliar, is a very small and tiny dog to begin with. However, the breed is known for being extremely fast and ornery when needed to defend itself. That said, Nessie had a serious problem – she was born right from the start missing her two front legs. So, there were plenty of folks who cared and wanted to provide the extra help for such a limited animal. However, Nessie’s condition was far more challenging to care for than many people thought. That became apparent each time Nessie was returned to the adoption shelter she came from. Three times Nessie was adopted and three time the challenged dog was brought back to the shelter. And each time the odds grew longer and longer about anyone successfully adopting the dog on a permanent basis going forward. That didn’t stop the staff at the shelter from trying anyways. They kept posting Nessie McNubbins’ photo on their Facebook page, hoping some particular stranger was out there who would go the very extra mile for this special dog. And that discovery, believe it or not, did actually happen.

Taking on Unconditional Love

Theresa Loyacano became Nessie’s human mom, unintentionally. She wasn’t hoping or actively searching for a pet. But sometimes photographs are more than 1,000 words. Sometimes they tell a lifetime of a story to a viewer and create such a relationship, the viewer falls instantly in love with the animal. That was the case when Loyacano saw Nessie for the first time while moving through Facebook pages and postings. Theresa moved on the matter, made contact with shelter, adopted Nessie and brought her home.

At first, Nessie was anxious. She was in a new environment with new sounds and smells and nothing that seemed even remotely familiar to her. Her tiny frame shook in fear and nervousness. However, dogs have an amazing ability to adapt to their surroundings and conditions, and Nessie was no exception. Within a few days and some nights of deep sleep, the little Chihuahua was starting to settle in. She had already been saddled with a set of basic wheels put on her when she was awake, giving the little dog a sense of mobility around Theresa’s house. And, if the dog was really excited to get to something, she had even figured out how to hop on her hind legs to move farther.

The Story of the Hopping Dog That Could

In some respects, Theresa likes to think the little Chihuahua is a bit of a kangaroo. The dog clearly thinks her way through problems with whatever she is capable of pulling off. Whether it’s an incline, stairs, obstacles, or similar, Nessie finds a way to get from point A to point B on her own.

Nessie is very much a lesson in resilience. Every morning the dog wakes up with the same challenge; her legs are never going to suddenly appear, allowing her to function like a normal dog. But that hasn’t stopped her. The disabled Chihuahua is persistent and confident, which makes her twice as adorable.

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Cape May Zoo Gets Two New Adorable Animals

Amanda J

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Cape May County Zoo, located in New Jersey, has recently welcomed two new exciting additions to their animal family. The first is a female North American River Otter named Ariel, who was brought in from the Kansas City Zoo to be a companion for Mork, the zoo’s resident bachelor otter.

North American River Otters, also known as Canadian otters or common otters, are found in freshwater habitats such as rivers, lakes, and marshes throughout North America. They are excellent swimmers and have webbed feet and a streamlined body that helps them move effortlessly in the water. River otters are known for their playful behavior and can often be seen sliding down muddy banks or diving for fish.

At Cape May County Zoo, Ariel has already made a splash with visitors and zookeepers alike. She and Mork are getting along well, and their playful antics are a joy to watch. The zoo hopes that the addition of Ariel will encourage breeding between the two otters and help to raise awareness about the conservation efforts being made to protect North American River Otters in the wild.

In addition to the new otter, Cape May County Zoo has also welcomed a baby lemur to their growing lemur family. The gender and name of the baby have yet to be revealed, but zookeepers report that the infant looks strong and healthy.

Lemurs are a group of primates found only on the island of Madagascar, off the coast of Africa. They are known for their distinctive appearance, with a long tail and large, expressive eyes. Lemurs come in a variety of sizes and colors, from the tiny mouse lemur to the larger ring-tailed lemur.

Cape May County Zoo has a thriving lemur exhibit, where visitors can see a variety of different species up close. The addition of the new baby lemur is sure to be a hit with visitors, who can watch as the infant grows and learns from its parents and other members of the lemur group.

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Touching Note Found In Thrift Store Books Resonates With Small Town

Sarrah M

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A simple note can sometimes carry a powerful message that resonates with us long after we first read it. Such is the case for Rose Farmer, a woman from a small town in America who stumbled upon a heartfelt note while browsing through books at her local Goodwill store. The note, written by a father to his son, contained a message of love, encouragement, and hope that deeply touched Farmer’s heart.

The note, which reads “believe Trent – Believe You are loved and respected! So let’s get going, the ride may be bumpy but we will get there. When you believe in you as much as I do you will be there. Dad,” was found by Farmer when it fell out of a book she was browsing. The book, “The Heart Is A Lonely Hunter” by Carson McCullers, is a novel about overcoming hopelessness, and the message in the note perfectly captured the book’s themes.

Moved by the note’s sentiment, Farmer purchased the book and began a search to find its intended recipient. She posted a photo of the note and book on her town’s Facebook page, hoping that someone would recognize it and come forward. While no one has yet come forward, the post has inspired many in the town and beyond, with people commenting on the post to express their appreciation for the message and to share their own stories of hope and resilience.

For Farmer, the note’s impact has been profound. She says that she was “touched by the love and encouragement” in the message and that she wanted to find the note’s intended recipient to “let them know that someone is thinking of them and sending them love.” But even without finding the note’s author or recipient, Farmer is grateful for the message and the opportunity it has given her to connect with others and spread hope and positivity.

In a world where negativity and despair can often seem overwhelming, the simple message in this note reminds us of the power of love, encouragement, and hope. It shows the resilience of the human spirit and is a reminder that we can all make a difference in the lives of others, even in small ways. For Farmer and others who have been touched by this message, the note serves as a reminder to keep believing and to keep striving for a brighter tomorrow.

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Adoptable Dogs Get Space From Winnipeg Paramedics for Bonding as They Await Adoption

Sarrah M

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Life can prove stressful for firefighters and paramedics. Therefore, having a stress-free environment to come back to is crucial for their wellbeing.

Several paramedic stations across Winnipeg are welcoming pets in an effort to improve morale and discover new homes for canines.

It’s a unique opportunity for the Winnipeg first response workers who want to host a dog that can get adopted while on duty to do so.

Having Murphy within their environs recently, according to WFPS Station 9 Captain Tim Arbuckle, has assisted us with easing stress in the environment after firefighters return from a difficult incident.

Arbuckle gushed, “It’s wonderful.” “I’ve just returned from a call in which I viewed first-hand that guys are searching for Murphy, and the dog is searching for them as well.”

Manitobans who are thinking about adopting a dog can take one out for an entire day, or for a whole weekend, or even a week, says City Animal Services GM Leland Gordon.

At Station 9, it has been running for a month, according to Gordon. However, it was only publicly announced on Wednesday. Gordon said that two additional stations have already contacted Animal Services to inquire about bringing canines into their facilities.

Keeping dogs in kennels and animal shelters is “nobody’s idea of fun,” according to Gordon.

In the past few weeks, Murphy has been treated like a VIP around this station. Murphy has gone home with emergency crews and medics, and even this weekend, he stayed in a luxurious lodge on an island.

Because of the difficulties that fire paramedics come across in their work, this program was established.

According to him, “It’s a stressful task that they do have here and you realize that they go through a lot of unpleasant encounters.” Isn’t the idea of coming back from a phone call and having a puppy to cuddle with just wonderful?

Chief WFPS Officer Christian Schmidt agreed with Gordon. In the two weeks since Murphy showed up, he’s spent two nights at Station 9, which has had an important influence on the staff and the dogs.

A number of employees have already written to him to convey their gratitude, he said. In terms of feedback for a leader, that’s excellent.

Schmidt also lauded Station Doggie Dates’ ability to raise understanding and appreciation of the city’s adoption program.

It’s been about three weeks since Murphy moved into Station 9 on Marion Street. For the time being, he’s happy there, but his ultimate objective is adoption.

Arbuckle said, “I’m not sure we want to see Murphy depart.” There would be no one like him.

Even though Murphy is still available for adoption, he’ll be spending more time at WFPS Station 9 for the time being.

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St. Louis Zoo Achieves Rare Cub Births

Danielle S

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Most times biologists and zoo specialists struggle with the news that an endangered species is shrinking in number and getting closer to extinction. However, for the Amur leopard population, there’s been a bit of good news instead. That’s because the Saint Louis Zoo has now become the latest in being able to help bring a pair of leopard cubs into the world.

The Amur leopard traditionally inhabited regions between Russia and China. It was never a well established animal, rare to begin with a preferring remote locations than those near people and development. However, by modern times there were estimated to be only 120 individual leopards left, and practically any new cubs have entirely happened in captivity, at least among those counted.

For the birth in the St. Louis Zoo, the arrival of a pair of two new cubs is a huge achievement for the leopard program. Named Anya as well as Irina, they are both female, and have been born healthy with flying colors. Now the challenge since their birth in the third week of April will be to maintain their growth and make sure there are no hitches. Their tenure in the maternity den will last a couple of months, through the summer, before they are introduced to the regular leopard containment.

The mother of the cubs, Dot, is expected to handle her job just fine. Following instinct, the big cat dotes on her cubs, never letting them out of her sight, even in the Zoo environment. For the zoo experts on hand, just seeing the cubs as they fumble around and develop their sense of the world is a gem. Most have only studied Amur leopards based on adults in the Zoo or through video files and similar. Seeing a cub from birth has been a first for a good number involved with their care. Not to mention, there are plenty of visitors as well wanting to see the same, even if just a glimpse.

The genesis of the cubs started with the arrival of their father, Samson, in 2021. He remains at the Zoo in a different enclosure, separated from the mother and cubs for their safety. Based on the pairing with Sampson and Dot, the results of a tremendous amount of genetic work proved successful with the pregnancy of Dot and the ultimate arrival of the cubs.

With their first vet check take care of, the cubs are rated in solid health, already weighing in at 2.5 pounds each. By the time they reach adulthood, each female leopard will carry a solid 125 pounds in muscle and fur. This kind of conservation effort and program may very well prove to be the primary means that saves the Amur leopard from complete extinction. It would be fitting given the fact that the animal’s decline was at the hands of human hunting and development in the first place.

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Kindergarten Help Line, Dial For An Adorable Pep Talk

Danielle S

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Positive news is hard to come by. Give it a try and most folks will probably find it a bit of a challenge to find a positive headline in the news. Negative is the norm, and it’s not surprising that people end up chronically depressed or stressed reading the news on a regular basis. And that’s in addition to life’s normal challenges. Add in the 24/7 spin of cable news and a constant barrage of bad news via the Internet and mobile devices, and people could be downright clinical after a while without a break.

Kindergarten to the Rescue

Fortunately, a creative project in Healdsburg, CA came up with a way to inspire thousands of adults on a daily basis with the help of kindergarteners. Yes, you read that right, five and six-year-olds are actively working to help adults make sense of modern life. The project was the brainchild of teachers at West Side Elementary, who thought it would be a good pick-me-up for the local folks to have a “hotline” where they could hear positive messages from the town’s kids. So, a phone number and hotline was set up with recorded messages one can hear by making a selection in the related phone tree once the call connects. The number provides options for folks who are frustrated, nervous, stressed or just need a pep talk to brighten up the day. What callers get on the other end of the line is a Healdsburg kindergartner’s voice giving the caller a mental boost.

Callers get a message reminding them to be thankful, positive reinforcement, humor and similar. The kids themselves are not talking live, but grade students from West Side Elementary in Healdsburg provide all the messages in recordings, which are then provided based on the caller’s menu selection.

A Darn Good Idea – Of Course it Came From Teachers

The Peptoc hotline was managed and put together by two teachers at the same school, Jessica Martin as well as Asherah Weiss. Given all the craziness that happened in 2020 thanks to the COVID pandemic and, given their rural location, the wildfire risk in the general area of Healdsburg, the two teachers felt something needed to be done to help boost the community’s mood. What they didn’t expect was that Peptoc was going to become so popular it would spread. Now folks are calling from all over, even outside of California, to get a bit of cheer and positive messaging from Healdsburg’s mighty kindergartners.

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